A great revolution in just one single individual will help achieve a change in the destiny of a society and, further, will enable a change in the destiny of humankind.

- Daisaku Ikeda

Big Test

Well, we said that no one should vote for any member of congress who supported the bailout. What happens when you have a popular incumbent moderate (R)epublican running against a socialist liberal? It should be an easy answer but it is not, because even though there is a (R) after the name that once denoted fiscal conservative, their vote demonstrates that they are big government political hacks in a Republican district.

To forgive the well-liked incumbent because it is easier is to simply demonstrate the lack of principals those in congress exhibited in support of the bailout. Sure, they may say they did not like the idea of socialism or allowing one of the men directly responsible for the problem to "repair" the problem, but to vote against it would be soooo hard because we are all in this together. In what together? A sinking socialist boat? If you vote for the likable incumbent how can you expect anything better of your congressional representatives, house and senate alike? If you have no principals--and limited government is a principal--how can you expect such from your representatives? And if we are unwilling to take a stand when the government has so unnecessarily and dangerously damaged the economy and capitalist system, then when will we take a stand?

How did your congressional representatives vote? The list.

For those who say they cannot vote for a (D)emocrat, ask yourself: "Is it better to vote for a socialist who tells you he is a socialist or a one who lies to you so he can lull you into complacency before he robs you?" Honesty is always the best policy and we should all be judged by our actions, not our words. These days, the socialist "liberals" are honest about who they are, the fiscal conservatives... Conservative? Where?

posted at 14:57:21 on 10/25/08 by clearpolitics - Category: Economics - [Permalink]

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