Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities. Truth isn't.

- Mark Twain

Goodbye Earmarks?

It seems a bit cowardly for George Bush to become fiscally conservative in his final State of the Union speech, but he seemed to express more fiscal responsibility than we have come to expect from the Remocrat. Perhaps one of the more interesting tidbits in the address was when he said that earmarks must be cut in half by congress or the spending would be vetoed. He also stated, correctly, that if a project was worth funding, let congress vote on the funding publicly. Even many (De)emocrats stood for those words, including Barack Obama.

There seems to be an air of truth around Obama, as if he wishes to ascend the stench of politics and speak to truth and possibility, which means he would have to be somewhat of a fiscal conservative. It may be that Obama is not interested in the Clear Politics as much as he is interested in the clear. If this were the case, the process will do everything it can to beat it out of him.

Welcome the slightly more fiscally responsible President Bush, and ask him where he has been the last 7 years. At this point, it may by nothing more than posturing for posterities sake.

posted at 21:32:01 on 01/28/08 by clearpolitics - Category: The Cause - [Permalink]

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Comments

esther e. sass wrote:

guess who will be ready on day 1!!!

"no single job on earth really qualifies somebody to be president of a great nation. it seems that the most neutral, unbiased measure is the length of time a candidate has served as an elected official.. serving as an elected official is the only position in which you're directly accountable to a diverse electorate. it's the only job that tests the skills a president will need to govern effectively..." -daniel lauber, co-author of a study at http://www.planningcommunic... obama11yrs, clinton 7 edwards 6.
also, the security report was 97, 97!!! pages and hillary did NOT read it! as of today 3940 americans and countless iraqis are dead.
01/29/08 11:20:14

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